Open Sourced Magic Ransomware Used to Permentantly Encrypt Files

Magic Ransomware

Cyber-criminals have once again used the open sourced code to developed Magic ransomware. The new malware is based on the EDA2 ransomware code created by security analyst Utku Sen. Unlike RANSOM_CRYPTEAR.B; there is no backdoor made by the developer. This means user files will be encrypted forever, permanently destroying the data.

About two weeks ago, reports of a ransomware named RANSOM_CRYPTEAR.B started to surface on bleeping computer forums. Mr. Sen developed two ransomware projects called Hidden Tear and EDA2 for educational purposes. He deliberately left a vulnerability in Hidden Tear’s code that would allow him to decrypt files in case would be attackers try to use it as malware. However, the EDA2 project, which Magic Ransomware is based on, has no such vulnerability. The severity of this second event has led Mr.Sen to admit that releasing these projects might not have been a great idea.

“I realized my mistake at that moment. I left everything on criminal’s hands. It should have been mistake-proof. I might had implement a backdoor which copies the database to another server in case of account suspension etc. Now, even criminals can’t recover the datas. Last week I mocked the Trendmicro guys for using “impossible to recover” sentence but now I’m facing it.”

So far security analyst has not been able to detect the vector used to infect computers. The first cases were reported on Bleeping Computer’s forums and analysed by security researcher Lawrence Abrams. According to Mr. Abrams, users reported leaving their computers only to come back to find a the data encrypted. This leads Mr. Abrams suspects the attacker are using hacked terminals or remote desktop connections to spread the malware.

The executable file retrieved by analysts is named magic.exe. The ransomware uses AES encryption and adds .magic extension to the encrypted data, hence the malware’s name. Once the and runs and installs, it will contact the command and control server requesting an RSA key to encrypt the AES key. The encrypted AES key is then sent back and stored in the Command and Control server. The malware will then targets a list of file extensions and begin the encryption.

.asf, .pdf, .xls, .docx, .xlsx, .mp3, .waw, .jpg, .jpeg, .txt, .rtf, .doc, .rar, .zip, .psd, .tif, .wma, .gif, .bmp, .ppt, .pptx, .docm, .xlsm, .pps, .ppsx, .ppd, .eps, .png, .ace, .djvu, .tar, .cdr, .max, .wmv, .avi, .wav, .mp4, .pdd, .php, .aac, .ac3, .amf, .amr, .dwg, .dxf, .accdb, .mod, .tax2013, .tax2014, .oga, .ogg, .pbf, .ra, .raw, .saf, .val, .wave, .wow, .wpk, .3g2, .3gp, .3gp2, .3mm, .amx, .avs, .bik, .dir, .divx, .dvx, .evo, .flv, .qtq, .tch, .rts, .rum, .rv, .scn, .srt, .stx, .svi, .swf, .trp, .vdo, .wm, .wmd, .wmmp, .wmx, .wvx, .xvid, .3d, .3d4, .3df8, .pbs, .adi, .ais, .amu, .arr, .bmc, .bmf, .cag, .cam, .dng, .ink, .jif, .jiff, .jpc, .jpf, .jpw, .mag, .mic, .mip, .msp, .nav, .ncd, .odc, .odi, .opf, .qif, .xwd, .abw, .act, .adt, .aim, .ans, .asc, .ase, .bdp, .bdr, .bib, .boc, .crd, .diz, .dot, .dotm, .dotx, .dvi, .dxe, .mlx, .err, .euc, .faq, .fdr, .fds, .gthr, .idx, .kwd, .lp2, .ltr, .man, .mbox, .msg, .nfo, .now, .odm, .oft, .pwi, .rng, .rtx, .run, .ssa, .text, .unx, .wbk, .wsh, .7z, .arc, .ari, .arj, .car, .cbr, .cbz, .gz, .gzig, .jgz, .pak, .pcv, .puz, .rev, .sdn, .sen, .sfs, .sfx, .sh, .shar, .shr, .sqx, .tbz2, .tg, .tlz, .vsi, .wad, .war, .xpi, .z02, .z04, .zap, .zipx, .zoo, .ipa, .isu, .jar, .js, .udf, .adr, .ap, .aro, .asa, .ascx, .ashx, .asmx, .asp, .indd, .asr, .qbb, .bml, .cer, .cms, .crt, .dap, .htm, .moz, .svr, .url, .wdgt, .abk, .bic, .big, .blp, .bsp, .cgf, .chk, .col, .cty, .dem, .elf, .ff, .gam, .grf, .h3m, .h4r, .iwd, .ldb, .lgp, .lvl, .map, .md3, .mdl, .nds, .pbp, .ppf, .pwf, .pxp, .sad, .sav, .scm, .scx, .sdt, .spr, .sud, .uax, .umx, .unr, .uop, .usa, .usx, .ut2, .ut3, .utc, .utx, .uvx, .uxx, .vmf, .vtf, .w3g, .w3x, .wtd, .wtf, .ccd, .cd, .cso, .disk, .dmg, .dvd, .fcd, .flp, .img, .isz, .mdf, .mds, .nrg, .nri, .vcd, .vhd, .snp, .bkf, .ade, .adpb, .dic, .cch, .ctt, .dal, .ddc, .ddcx, .dex, .dif, .dii, .itdb, .itl, .kmz, .lcd, .lcf, .mbx, .mdn, .odf, .odp, .ods, .pab, .pkb, .pkh, .pot, .potx, .pptm, .psa, .qdf, .qel, .rgn, .rrt, .rsw, .rte, .sdb, .sdc, .sds, .sql, .stt, .tcx, .thmx, .txd, .txf, .upoi, .vmt, .wks, .wmdb, .xl, .xlc, .xlr, .xlsb, .xltx, .ltm, .xlwx, .mcd, .cap, .cc, .cod, .cp, .cpp, .cs, .csi, .dcp, .dcu, .dev, .dob, .dox, .dpk, .dpl, .dpr, .dsk, .dsp, .eql, .ex, .f90, .fla, .for, .fpp, .jav, .java, .lbi, .owl, .pl, .plc, .pli, .pm, .res, .rsrc, .so, .swd, .tpu, .tpx, .tu, .tur, .vc, .yab, .aip, .amxx, .ape, .api, .mxp, .oxt, .qpx, .qtr, .xla, .xlam, .xll, .xlv, .xpt, .cfg, .cwf, .dbb, .slt, .bp2, .bp3, .bpl, .clr, .dbx, .jc, .potm, .ppsm, .prc, .prt, .shw, .std, .ver, .wpl, .xlm, .yps, .1cd, .bck, .html, .bak, .odt, .pst, .log, .mpg, .mpeg, .odb, .wps, .xlk, .mdb, .dxg, .wpd, .wb2, .dbf, .ai, .3fr, .arw, .srf, .sr2, .bay, .crw, .cr2, .dcr, .kdc, .erf, .mef, .mrw, .nef, .nrw, .orf, .raf, .rwl, .rw2, .r3d, .ptx, .pef, .srw, .x3f, .der, .pem, .pfx, .p12, .p7b, .p7c, .jfif, .exif

Despite the lack of vulnerabilities in EDA2’s encryption, Mr Sen did leave a backdoor that would allow him to access the database containing the decryption keys. Nonetheless, the attacker was using a free web hosting service for the Command and Control server which in turn got suspended. The attackers account has been suspended which resulted in all the data in the server being lost including the encryption keys. According to the hosting site, once an account is suspended all files are delete with no backups.

The argument for freedom of information and the security implications of said information has been a topic of much debate since the internet’s inception. Despite Mr. Sen’s best intentions to release these projects for educational purposes, the events in the past weeks shows that not everybody lives by the honor system. In an age where information is readily available for everyone to see, steps most are taken to ensure certain information can only be accessed by responsible parties.

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